Strained Electronics: Using Magnetoelasticity to Slash Energy Waste in Modern Electronics

Wednesday, March 1, 2017

8:45am


John Domann
University of California, Los Angeles

ABSTRACT:

Electronic devices currently consume 5% of the total US energy expenditure, and with their increasing ubiquity are predicted to surpass the 40% mark by 2030. Inefficiencies and leakage currents in nanoscale CMOS components are key reasons for this rapidly increasing energy consumption. For example, flipping a bit of digital information (0 to 1) in state of the art charge based commercial devices is currently a 0.03% to 0.0003% efficient process. This talk will discuss how strain mediated multiferroic devices provide a path to multiple order of magnitude energy efficiency improvements by controlling nanoscale magnetism with mechanical strain. After an introduction to magnetoelasticity, it will be shown that magnetoelasticity can be used for data transmission and reception with an in depth analysis of a strain powered antenna. An eigenmode expansion of a vibrating piezomagnetic antenna will be employed to couple solid mechanics with electrodynamics. A Green’s function approach is then utilized to compute the steady state electrodynamic fields and total radiated power for a strain powered antenna. A direct comparison of conventional and strain powered antennas will generate an important figure of merit and identify the material property space necessary for efficient strain powered radiation. Analysis of the material properties required for efficient radiation will lead to a discussion of nanoscale magnetism, and the precessional equations of motion for magnetic moments. Micromagnetic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert models will then be used to illustrate how highly energy efficient strain mediated data storage devices can be created. This talk highlights recent advances on the creation of mechanically controlled electronics, and will close with a look at future directions for the field and what becomes possible when it succeeds.

BIOGRAPHY:

Electronic devices currently consume 5% of the total US energy expenditure, and with their increasing ubiquity are predicted to surpass the 40% mark by 2030. Inefficiencies and leakage currents in nanoscale CMOS components are key reasons for this rapidly increasing energy consumption. For example, flipping a bit of digital information (0 to 1) in state of the art charge based commercial devices is currently a 0.03% to 0.0003% efficient process. This talk will discuss how strain mediated multiferroic devices provide a path to multiple order of magnitude energy efficiency improvements by controlling nanoscale magnetism with mechanical strain. After an introduction to magnetoelasticity, it will be shown that magnetoelasticity can be used for data transmission and reception with an in depth analysis of a strain powered antenna. An eigenmode expansion of a vibrating piezomagnetic antenna will be employed to couple solid mechanics with electrodynamics. A Green’s function approach is then utilized to compute the steady state electrodynamic fields and total radiated power for a strain powered antenna. A direct comparison of conventional and strain powered antennas will generate an important figure of merit and identify the material property space necessary for efficient strain powered radiation. Analysis of the material properties required for efficient radiation will lead to a discussion of nanoscale magnetism, and the precessional equations of motion for magnetic moments.  Micromagnetic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert models will then be used to illustrate how highly energy efficient strain mediated data storage devices can be created. This talk highlights recent advances on the creation of mechanically controlled electronics, and will close with a look at future directions for the field and what becomes possible when it succeeds.