Recognizing research driven by patients’ quality of life, Robin Queen receives National Award


March 22nd, 2017


The Kappa Delta Sorority and the Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation (OREF) have presented Robin Queen with the 2017 Young Investigator’s Award.

Queen, an associate professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering and Mechanics and director of the Kevin P. Granata Biomechanics Lab, also holds a fellowship with the American College of Sports Medicine and is an associate professor in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine.

The ceremony, held on March 16, 2017, recognizes outstanding contributions in the field of musculoskeletal research. First awarded in 1950, the Kappa Delta recognizes the best of orthopaedic scientific exploration. This award remains one of the most sought-after and prestigious achievements in musculoskeletal research throughout the world.

Queen’s recognition honors her prior and ongoing research exploring the quality of life and functional recovery in patients with ankle arthritis as well as those who receive a total ankle replacement (arthroplasty). Whereas many previous studies have focused on the ankle joint specifically with an emphasis on examining implant failure and operative complications, Queen is taking a more holistic approach to assessing patient outcomes. Permanent alterations in walking mechanics that result from ankle arthritis often have a far-reaching effect on long-term health and function. With deeper awareness of these health impacts, clinical care can be adapted to deliver a higher quality of life and lower the incidence of second surgeries.

“We examine more than just the ankle joint,“ Queen says. “It is important to understand how the joint with arthritis is responding, but it is equally as important to understand these changes impact joint movement in both legs and to treat the entire patient, not just one joint.  . Understanding overall function will allow us to develop patient centered care models for surgery and rehabilitation that will allow us to improve long-term physical function and quality of life.”